Stay on Course with Your Nutrition with a Kitchen Makeover

By Breanne Nalder, MS, RDN, PLAN7 Endurance Coaching Dietitian

Cycling West - Cycling Utah Magazine logoWe may be past resolution setting time of year. What happened to those goals you set for yourself? Are they still on a sticky note next to your computer or do you remain on track? Your intentions were undoubtedly good, the problem with resolutions is they are generally outcome based.Most lists will look something like:

  1. Lose weight
  2. Get organized
  3. Drink less
  4. Train more

So where is the plan of action? In order to ensure you accomplish a goal, try making them with the intent of being measurable, attainable, and positive. Setting behavioral resolutions or goals puts you on track for success. For example, “on Saturday I will organize a grocery list to buy only nutritious food this week” or “I will train 15 hours this week.” Here are a few ideas to help you make specific plans to accomplishing your goals, whatever they may be.

If a food is in your possession or located in your residence, either you, someone you love, or someone you marginally tolerate will eventually eat it. -John Berardi

Do a kitchen makeover! Get rid of all the non-nutritious stuff and/or food triggers and replace them with healthy foods and snacks.If a food and/or drink isn’t conducive to your goals, why would you keep it?A kitchen makeover will help you stay in control and on track. You don’t want to be deciding between ice cream and spinach while standing in front of the fridge 15 minutes to dinner time.

What’s “Unhealthy Food”? If you think it’s junk, it is.

Obvious Junk Foods

  • Chips
  • Chocolates or candy
  • Soda/pop/sweetened drinks
  • Alcohol, especially flavored/sweetened mixed drinks
  • Instant foods like cake mixes and mashed potatoes
  • Margarine and other processed fats
  • Most frozen dinners
  • Most take-out or restaurant leftovers
  • Bowls of candy or other snacks sitting around
  • Flavored nuts (e.g. beer nuts)

Trick Foods

These are foods that seem healthy but aren’t. They’ve gone from something good (whole, unprocessed food) to something that a machine spit out, something that’s full of sugar and chemicals, and/or something that’s had all its original nutrients stripped out.

  • Sweetened yogurt, frozen yogurt, and even dairy alternative products
  • Breads and bagels, unless they’re made exclusively with whole grains
  • Other baked goods (coconut oil even adds up as a hydrogenated fat)
  • Breakfast cereals
  • Crackers, even the whole grain ones
  • Fruit, cereal, and/or granola bars
  • Regular peanut butter
  • Fruit juice

A good rule here is to check the labels. Look for forms of sugar such as high fructose corn syrup as well as hydrogenated oil, fractioned oil, and preservatives.

My kitchen’s empty! Now what?

It’s time to restock your kitchen with healthy replacements for the garbage you just unloaded. All you have to do is make the available food good stuff, and nature takes care of the rest. Thus, take the restocking process seriously. It’s just as important as the removal process.

How to Restock

Here’s how to quickly restock some nutritious foods. Start by picking your 3 favorite:

  • Vegetables
  • Fruits
  • Lean proteins
  • Nuts/seeds
  • Whole grains (oats, quinoa, wild rice, brown rice, sprouted grains, etc.)

Write them down. The fewer ingredients the better!

Check out how simple this restocking process can be based on the following sample shopping lists:

Healthy Shopping List Table

Seems reasonable, right?!

Yes! The rest of the family (kids, spouse, etc.) can eat these foods too. Why would you feed your family something you wouldn’t eat yourself? Take pride in what you bring to the table, to the pantry, to your bodies. You’ll sleep better, train better, and over time your physique will change too! If you are looking to up your nutrition game and really add the “missing” piece to your training plan, contact me and I’ll help you makeover your nutrition life!

Breanne Nalder, MS, RDN has a Master’s degree in Nutrition with an emphasis in Sports Dietetics at the University of Utah. She is a Registered Dietitian, the nutrition coach at PLAN7 Endurance Coaching, and races on the road and gravel on the professional level. For personal nutrition coaching, you can reach Breanne at 801-550-0434 or [email protected]

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